Greek Tuna Lentil Patties Recipe

Lentils and tuna make a delicious and simple meal  that's packed with protein!

“Party days” are one of the highlights of getting to teach history at our weekly classical academy. The children dress up in period costumes (aka Daddy’s t-shirts, sheets, and ribbons) and learn about the culture of long-distant civilizations. Last week we studied the ancient Greeks.

While I scoured the internet trying to find simple, authentic-ish finger food recipes, I had an idea. I was afraid most of the students probably wouldn’t like them, but since others brought dates, fruit drizzled with honey, and pita bread with olive oil, I wasn’t too worried about pleasing everyone.

Living by the Mediterranean, fish was a staple for ancient Greeks. Often it was mixed with cheese in recipes. Lentils were also a staple. So, how about melding all three staples into tuna lentil patties?

Much to my surprise, almost all the students liked the patties. The fact that we had a mock Olympics earlier that morning might have helped, but I was still pleasantly surprised. Rose liked them so much she asked if we could have them again that night for dinner.

These Greek-inspired tuna lentil patties are super simple, packed with protein, and frugal to boot! Not only did we have them for dinner that night, they are getting added to our revolving monthly menu  for a simple weeknight meal.

Greek Tuna Lentil Patties Recipe

Inspired by the ancient Greeks and Kristen’s delicious salmon rice cakes

Ingredients

  • 2-3 cups cooked lentils
  • 2 cans of tuna, drained (Canned salmon is also delicious in this recipe, though not found in the Mediterranean. I was surprised to find that a type of tuna is.)
  • 1 onion, finely diced (optional)
  • 1/2 cup shredded cheese
  • 2 eggs
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Garlic powder, optional
  • Butter (or olive oil) for frying
  • Parsley, optional

You can fry these in a pan on the stove, but after Joshua finally convinced me we ought to get an electric skillet, I have used it multiple times every week. This is the one we got and I love how portable it is!

Frying a panful of tuna lentil patties for an easy, healthy lunch.

Sizzling away in butter. Yummy! 

Instructions

  1. Cook the lentils in water according to the instructions on the bag. Sprinkle liberally with salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
  2. Combine lentils with the rest of the ingredients except butter and parsley.
  3. Heat frying pan to medium
  4. Lather butter in the pan
  5. Scoop the batter and drop onto the melted butter
  6. Fry the first side until it is golden brown and the egg is mostly set.
  7. Flip and finish frying.
  8. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and parsley, if desired.

Serve hot with salad, sweet potato fries, or pita bread dipped in olive oil.

Inspired by an ancient Greek homeschool study, these tuna lentil patties are easy, delicious, and so healthy!

If you want to be really authentic, don’t serve tomatoes. They were introduced to Greek cuisine from “The New World” only a few centuries ago. They sure pair well though! 

Greek-inspired tuna lentil patties

I never would have guessed that a concoction put together solely for an ancient Greek party would end up a welcome addition to our menu. Not only are these tuna lentil patties a little taste of ancient Greece, they are healthy, filling, and delicious.

[Full disclosure: links to products in this post are my referral links.]

Cuban Bread Recipe

Whip up this delicious no-knead Cuban bread and have it on the table in just over an hour!

[Full disclosure: links to products in this post are my referral posts.]

Back when I was tutoring a Western Civilization class, I came across this random tidbit that about made my head spin. Especially with the whole gluten-free diets that have swept the country.

The daily ration for monks in Carolingian society was 3.7 pounds of bread! (from Spielvogel’s Western Civilization)

3.7 pounds. Can you imagine? That’s like several loaves of whole wheat bread every single day! 

When my friend Candace introduced me to this Cuban bread recipe I thought, hmmmmm, I probably couldn’t eat 3.7 pounds of this bread, but I probably could polish off a whole loaf on my own. 

Don’t worry, I didn’t. But it is awfully tasty. It doesn’t need to be kneaded and it only takes about an hour from start to finish, including baking time! Talk about easy!

Cuban Bread Recipe

Modified from the Tightwad Gazette (I almost always modify any new recipe using these simple strategies to make it healthier.)

Ingredients

Quick and delicious, this {almost} whole-wheat cuban bread is a must-try recipe!

Instructions

Grease a cookie sheet.

Combine the first five ingredients. Add enough white flour to make a soft dough. Let the dough rise for 15 minutes. Divide and shape it into two round loaves, brush with water, and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Place a pan of hot water on the lowest rack of a cold oven.

Place the loaves on the middle rack and then turn the oven on to 375. Bake for 30-45 minutes or until a light golden brown. Once it’s done, lightly spray with cold water for a nice soft crust. Serve warm with butter.

See, isn’t that easy?!

Easy and delicious, this Cuban bread recipe only takes about an hour from start to finish!

Make some Cuban Bread

As you can see, this is one of the easiest bread recipes ever, and it’s ever so moist and delicious. Whip up a batch and have it on the table in just over an hour!

Hootenanny Recipe

Hootenanny.

It’s got to be one of the funniest-named breakfasts ever. And it sure looks funny as it rises and topples in the oven. But hootenanny is delicious, delightfully simple, and (with a light dusting of powdered sugar) a fancy way to serve eggs.

Joshua grew up eating it and now we’re all fans.

Because it’s so simple to mix together, it makes a great Sunday morning breakfast. Toss the hootenanny in the oven, get ready for church, eat breakfast, and go!

Looking for a delicious breakfast that's simple to make, tastes delicious, and is full of protein? Try this hootenanny recipe!

The mountains of puff have fallen. Since the very best part of hootenanny is the crust, Joshua came up with the brilliant idea of baking it in muffin tins. Yumminess! 

Hootenanny Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 4-6 T butter
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 cup  of milk
  • 1 cup flour (we use half freshly-ground whole grain flour, but have also used 100% rice flour for a gluten-free version. It wasn’t quite as puffy, but was still really tasty.)
  • scant 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 T vanilla, opt. (make your own vanilla !)
  • dash of cinnamon/nutmeg, opt.

Hootenanny is a new favorite breakfast treat (and Sunday morning tradition!) It is simple to make, healthy, and so fun to watch as it grows and topples in the oven.  Plus, you can replace the flour with rice flour for a gluten-free treat!

One of the ways Joshua helps me celebrate the Lord’s day is by making hootenanny with the kids. (Usually we use paper plates all Sunday long too! The fancy plate was just for the pictures-sake.) 

Hootenanny Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°.
  2. Melt butter in a 9×13 pan OR 12 muffin tins.
  3. While butter melts, mix together remaining ingredients.
  4. Pour over melted butter. Do NOT stir.
  5. Bake for 30 minutes or until golden brown around the edges.
  6. Serve with real maple syrup and a light dusting of powdered sugar.

Enjoy your Hootenanny

Whether you join us in our Sunday morning tradition of hot hootenanny, or just make it for a special treat, I think you’ll agree that hootenanny is a delightfully fun (and tasty!)  breakfast food.

Favorite Fruit Popsicles

The first real waves of summer heat are upon us and it’s popsicle season again (not that my kids would object to popsicles in the dead of winter.)

I have been doing my best to keep the freezer stocked with homemade, real food popsicles. The kids love helping make them, and I love knowing their favorite summer snack is not pumped full of sugar and food coloring.

Here are a few of our favorite fruit-sweetened popsicles.

Fruit juice popsicles

One of my favorite garage sales finds of the season was a set of old-fashioned popsicle holders that are just like the ones I loved as a kid! Need popsicle molds? Amazon has a great selection!

Fruit juice popsicles

Fill popsicle holders with leftover fruit juice: apple, orange, grape, mixed, etc. Freeze and enjoy. (I can’t think of many simpler ways to get happy grins from my kiddos!)

Creamy fruit popsicles

Mix plain yogurt with freshly mashed strawberries OR orange juice concentrate. Sweeten lightly, if desired (I use agave nectar, but sugar or honey would work great too) Freeze and enjoy.

Fresh fruit popsicles

Aren’t these just amazing looking? Freeze fresh fruit in watermelon puree or fruit juice for a gorgeous and delicious summer treat! Usually I’m not that fancy though.

What are you favorite hot-weather snacks? 

 May be linked up at Mama MomentsGrowing HomeHealthy 2Day ,Works for MeWalking RedeemedGraced SimplicityFabulously Frugal & Simple Lives

[Full disclosure: links to products in this post are my referral links.]

Recipe: Homemade Lime Soda

When I was morning sick with Edmund, a friend recommended club soda to calm the nausea. It helped. For weeks, club soda was a regular staple at the dinner table. Even though it didn’t take the nausea away, it really helped take the edge off.

Then when three weeks of the stomach flu hit our home, we went through can after can of club soda.

Soda water has been used for centuries to calm nausea and it’s a staple in our pantry now.

Delicious homemade lime soda

Of course, it’s not just good for calming stomach complaints, it makes such delicious summer drinks.

My favorite is this refreshing lime soda that Joshua makes as a special treat for the kids (and me!) It’s made with freshly-squeezed limes and raw sugar or agave nectar and makes a delicious substitute to regular soda. Plus, it’s so easy to control the sweetness.

Homemade Lime Soda

Ingredients

  • Fresh limes (or lemons)
  • Agave nectar, liquid sugar in the raw, or homemade simple syrup
  • Club soda
  • Ice
  • Fresh mint, optional
Instructions
  1. Fill glasses with crushed ice.
  2. Fill glasses 3/4 full with club soda.
  3. Squeeze limes.
  4. Add lime juice and liquid sweetener to taste.
  5. Garnish with fresh mint, if desired.
Looking for more refreshing summer drinks? Try kefir water. It’s not only tasty, it’s filled with probiotics.
[Thanks Brooke!]

Garden Musings

Despite visits from aphids, stink bugs, leaf hoppers, earwigs, slugs, cucumber beetles, and squash vine borers, last year we had our very first “successful” garden since getting married. (Not moving, living out of state and/or having serious medical issues all summer definitely helped!)

The snow has melted (at least the latest round), leaving the bare mulch-covered garden plots beckoning for me to come play in them. Months of severe winter cold have intensified my spring planting fever.

As I cozy up with seed catalogs, here are a few tips from one budding gardener to another.

Petunias-a lovely companion plant (photo credit)

Plant beautiful things, not just practical- a dear friend of mine and I were pouring over the Baker Creek seed magazine last spring while we day-dreamed about our gardens. Hers was going to be lovely, with dahlias and zinnias stealing the limelight and vegetables conveniently tucked in between them. My garden? It was going to be as practical as could be.

“Anna! Look at these beautiful flowers!” my friend said, “You CAN’T just plant vegetables! Make it beautiful, not just practical.”

I did. Sort of. I lined the garden with marigolds, petunias and zinnias (all of which are supposed to be highly beneficial for the vegetables in the garden, making them practical and beautiful choices.)

The flowers did more than just attract good bugs to fight the myriad of bad bugs attacking our garden though. Each time I looked down at the garden from my bedroom window, it was the brilliant yellow marigolds and soft pink petunias that made me want to pull out the gardening tools and play in the dirt. Beauty attracted me and encouraged me to care for the more practical things, like tomatoes or squash.

Finish what you start

Normally spring finds me dreaming of gardens and drawing and redrawing garden plans. As spring gives way to the heat of summer and bugs and heat battle for control of the garden, it’s harder to keep motivated.

Plan from the beginning to finish strong. Usually, at the end of season I let the garden debris sit for at least a month before tackling it. Sometimes it sits until springtime. This time I cleaned up the garden the day after our first hard frost. The experience was amazing. Every time I looked out the window on the nicely mulched beds it made me excited for spring to come again.

Dead-head your flowers

Much like in life, leaving a spent flower on the plant saps nutrients from going to form fresh flowers. I had no idea the difference that dead-heading flowers makes until this past year! Regularly snipping off the dead flowers kept the plants blooming beautifully all summer long. (If you’ve got littles, dead-heading is a great job for them to do supervised. They get to learn about gardening *and* use scissors. Total win.)

Surround yourself with experienced gardeners

Wise gardener friends, beautiful blogs like Deep Roots at Home, and inspiring books like “One Magic Square” (read my review here) make gardening an even more delightful experience.

Don’t Expect Perfection

Unless you have a really green thumb, use loads of pesticides and/or have a full-time gardener in your employ, don’t expect perfection. In One Magic Square, Lolo says to expect at least one crop to fail, others to do so-so and a few to do splendidly.

Even if you follow all the right steps, some years you just might not get calendula to grow. Even if you plant it four times. Supposedly it’s one of the hardiest fail-proof plants in the garden. Not my garden. At least not last year. Maybe this year I’ll have better success.

Plant Herbs

If you have time for nothing else, buy a few herbs and stick them in the ground. With the exception of calendula, the herbs I planted could hardly have been simpler to grow and it was so rewarding to step out and pick fresh parsley or basil to garnish a meal or add a few sprigs of fresh thyme or rosemary to a sauce.

Track Your Harvest

When we harvested our first ripe cucumber, we marked a tally on an empty “Produce From Our Garden” list. As the garden grew and we brought in a basket bursting with produce, we’d make tallies on the sheet: five tomatoes, two cucumbers, two squash, etc.

Real gardeners feel free to laugh, but it was such a fun way to see just how the garden did. The only problem was that when we showed Joshua our list, he realized just how little of the produce lasted till dinner time for him to enjoy with us. (Really, I’m grateful the kids love vegetables, but they’d gladly eat a basketful of vegetables each day!)

Around the time Edmund joined our family we lost track, but the tally marks had already proved the garden a smashing success. (Not that there’s really such a thing as a failed garden.)

Linked up at Mama MomentsGrowing HomeHealthy 2DayFrugal Days, Sustainable Ways,Works for MeWalking RedeemedGraced SimplicityProverbs 31, & Simple Lives

[Full disclosure: links to some products in this post are my referral links.]

 

DIY Homemade Vanilla Extract

Of all the DIY projects to try, homemade vanilla extract is among the easiest. It just takes two simple ingredients, but makes a rich, fragrant extract to use in your kitchen or give as a lovely gift.

Plus, your kitchen will smell simply delightful for hours and hours after you make it.

Homemade vanilla extract is delicious and delightfully easy to make! It only has two ingredients, but makes a lovely addition to any recipe (and amazing DIY gift!)

Vanilla beans and alcohol= delicious pure vanilla extract

How to Make Homemade Vanilla Extract

There are a whopping two ingredients you’ll need for your homemade extract: vanilla beans and alcohol. Can’t get much simpler than that….you just have to choose what kind of beans and what kind of alcohol.

Vanilla beans:

There are several kinds of vanilla beans, but Bourbon (also known as Madagascar) is the popular scent we’d all instantly recognize as vanilla and the type I bought. Then there’s two grades: A and B. Grade A beans have more oil and are considered better for cooking. However, the grade B beans are generally preferred for making extract.

[I ordered my vanilla beans here. You can also order certified organic and fair trade vanilla beans and cute glass jars from Mountain Rose Herbs]

Alcohol:

Vodka, bourbon, tequila…any should work fine (just don’t use inedible rubbing alcohol!) I made one batch with vodka and one with bourbon to experiment. The bourbon lends a fun bourbon-esqe flavor, but if you’re after the true vanilla flavor, vodka is the way to go.

 (Whew, how’s that for making a simple recipe a bit more complicated!)

For a strong vanilla extract, use 1/4 pound of beans (approx. 25 beans, but it can vary a lot) to 1 quart of alcohol.

Slice the vanilla beans down the center, leaving them attached at the end if you think it looks pretty.

Place in clean glass jar. Cover completely with alcohol. Screw the lid on tightly and store for one to six months in a cool dark place stirring regularly (daily…or weekly…or whenever you happen to remember.)

Label and date, at least if you tend to forget exactly what and when you bottled as quickly as I do.

Start using when the extract smells vanilla-y enough to you. As you use the vanilla, you can add more alcohol. The vanilla won’t be as strong, but I kept reusing the vanilla beans we were given till they lost most of their potency.

Once they’re satisfactorily extracted don’t throw them away! Turn the beans into vanilla sugar.

 [Full disclosure: links to some products in this post are my referral links.]

Pain Free: Works for Me

A few months ago my neck was so stiff I could scarcely move it. I tried not to wince when one of the kids gave me a hug. Holding baby Edmund hurt. Moving hurt, but so did laying down. I woke up in the night in pain and tossed and turned for ages trying to find the least painful position. The pain was so intense that I felt nauseous.

I’m not sure what caused the neck pain. Maybe it was flare-up from a fender bender I was in several years ago. Maybe it was falling forward down the stairs when I was pregnant and landing with a thud on my left hand. Maybe it was simply from carrying a cute chubby baby around for hours each day.

Whatever the cause, the symptoms went from occasional tenseness to sharp pain and stiffness that flared up and then lingered for days. I felt eighty, not twenty-eight.

I went to the chiropractor, took warm baths in epsom salts, and rested with cold packs. The relief was temporary. Pain medicine barely took the edge off.

[Full disclosure: links to some products in this post are my referral links.]

Then I remembered a book that a good friend had recommended: Pain Free. I’d ordered Pain Free for Women* months ago, but let it sit on the shelf untouched until the pain simply got unbearable.

I turned to the first page and started reading. At first I was skeptical, but as I kept reading, the case Pete Egoscue made grew more and more convincing. Unlike our ancestors, he argued, most of us lead sedentary lives. What little movement we do get is often repetitive. Even many of our sports and exercises only work small groups of muscles.

After spending countless hours pouring over school books or hunched over computers, our posture is compromised and our core musculoskeletal structures are highly taxed. That, Egoscue claims, leads to chronic pain and other problems.

The solution, he says, is simple. Instead of masking the symptoms, we need to correct the underlying problems with our alignment.

It seemed too simple. How could lying on my back with my knees bent over a chair and my arms stretched out help my neck? But like Naaman’s servants urged him, “If he’d asked you to do something hard, wouldn’t you have done it in order to be healed?” Of course.

The results astounded me.

After doing the neck exercises from Pain Free just once, I could move my neck and the pain was almost 100% gone.  That night I slept soundly and woke up feeling incredibly refreshed.

Egoscue recommends doing the exercises daily and not listening to music or audio. Just do the exercises and listen to your body’s signals.

I haven’t always been able to fit 20-30 minutes of quiet exercises into the day, but whenever I can it has been time well spent!

Not only am I pain free, after regular struggles with insomnia, now when I go to bed I fall asleep almost instantly. When I get woken up in the night, I don’t lay there for hours wishing for sleep, I just go back to sleep. After over a decade of not being able to wear mascara or put my hair up without getting a headache, I’ve done both. My poor posture has improved dramatically. Plus, it forces me to “be still” for a few minutes in the midst of a noisy world.

Needless to say, I’m stoked at the amazing results I’ve had. Although Egoscue claims that our spine and hips, which are incredibly designed to bear our weight without pain, are the result of lucky evolution, I think it’s just one more reason to praise and worship our Creator.

Each of our bodies are different, but if you’re in chronic pain, I’d  highly recommended trying out Pain Free.

(Aneysa and Abigail, my very hearty thanks for your recommendations!)

*Pain Free deals with specific areas of pain, while Pain Free for Women deals more with overall women’s maintenance.

Herbal Gargle for a Sore Throat

Some sore throats aren’t that big a deal. But then there’s the kind that leaves you wincing every time you have to swallow or talk or breathe.

It was that kind of sore throat that made me gather up the courage to try Rosemary Gladstar’s “Good Gargle for a Bad Throat” from her excellent book Medicinal Herbs. Rosemary jokes that people get addicted to this nasty concoction because it works so well.

It sure worked for me.

I’m definitely not dying to have another sore throat so I can put it to work again, but am glad to have an herbal remedy at my finger tips that soothes the pain and helps the throat heal amazingly quickly, even if it is quite nasty!

Sage Leaf Rubbed, Organic

Sage fights colds and relaxes the mucous membranes (from the Bulk Herb Store)

I am not a doctor or a nurse. The only hospital I have ever worked at is a doll hospital. There, a band-aid can cure a heart attack. As always, please do you own research and talk to your health care provider if your condition is serious. 

Herbal Gargle for a Sore Throat

adapted from Rosemary Gladstar’s Medicinal Herbs

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 T. dried sage
  • 1 tsp goldenseal root
  • 1 T. sea salt
  • pinch of cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 cup unpasteurized apple cider vinegar

Instructions

  1. Boil water. Steep the sage and goldenseal [If the goldenseal is in its root form. If it’s powdered wait.] for 30-45 minutes, keeping covered. Strain.
  2. Add remaining ingredients.
  3. Gargle 1-2 teaspoons for as long as you can stand every 30 to 60 minutes until the sore throat abates.

If your sore throat leaves you wincing in pain when you swallow, try this powerful herbal gargle for sore throats. It worked wonders for me!

photo credit

Fight sore throats

If each gulp leaves you wincing, fight back with this powerful herbal gargle for a sore throat.

[Full disclosure: links to some products in this post are my referral links.]

How to Make Kefir Water

Lime flavored kefir water, garnished with fresh mint. 

When a dear friend offered me a glass of homemade kefir water, all sorts of alarms sounded in my mind.

I’m not quite sure what I was expecting. It sure wasn’t a drink that tasted like an amazing sparkling limeade.

What exactly is kefir water? It’s a slightly sweet carbonated drink that’s simply bursting with probiotics. You make it by letting kefir “grains” (a gel-like combination of yeast and bacteria) sit in sugar water and minerals for a couple of days and ferment into a drink that’s refreshing and incredibly good for you.

We eat homemade yogurt regularly, but I’d been wanting to add more probiotics to our diet. After that first drink, kefir water was an obvious choice!

My friend gave me a kefir starter (thanks so much!) and I’m having a hard time keeping up with demand even with doing a gallon at a time. My 22-month-old’s name for kefir water is simply “nummy!”

We don’t even have pet fish, just pet bacteria. Thankfully, they’re about as low-maintenance as fish, plus you get a yummy drink out of them!

Kefir water recipe

(Makes one gallon—so far the gallon hasn’t lasted more than a few days! You can also half the batch.)

Ingredients

  • Heaping 1/2 cup kefir grains*
  • 3/4 cup to 1 cup raw natural sugar, depending on how sweet you want it. 
  • Small handful of organic raisins or other dried fruit 
  • 1 eggshell or trace minerals, optional 
  • 1 gallon water [Spring, well or filtered tap water are the best options. Distilled water has lost so many minerals you’d want to add trace minerals back to the water.] 
  • Flavorings, optional

Instructions

  1. In a glass gallon jar, dissolve the sugar in a little water.
  2. Add the raisins, kefir grains, eggshell/minerals (if using), and finish filling with water.
  3. Cover with cheesecloth or a tea towel and rubberband securely.
  4. Let sit on the counter for 2-4 days. If it tastes good after two days, proceed. If you want more of the sugar “eaten”, let sit for another day. Don’t let it go too long though, especially in the summer, otherwise once the grains run out of sugar to eat, they beging to starve.
  5. Removed the raisins and eggshell and toss. Strain out the grains to start a new batch.
  6. Start a new batch immediately or store the kefir grains. 
  7. You can drink the kefir at this point, but it tastes much yummier if you let it carbonate for a day on the counter. To carbonate, pour into sturdy glass jars, leaving plenty of headspace for the kefir water to expand. I leave a good 2+ inches, to be on the safe side. Add fruit, juice, food-grade essential oils, or vanilla (if desired) for flavoring. Seal tightly and leave on the counter for a day. 
  8. Refrigerate or drink immediately over ice.

Tips and tricks: 

  • If you don’t have a local friend who can give you a starter, you can order dehydrated water kefir grains online from Amazon or a kit (including minerals and a strainer) from Cultures for Health
  • To store the kefir grains, mix 1/4 cup of sugar with filtered water. Add the grains and store in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. 
  • Kefir grains love the added minerals from eggshells, but the thought of tossing in a raw eggshell groses me out. Instead, save the eggshells when you make hardboiled eggs and store them in the freezer. Just pop one out when it’s time to make another batch of kefir.
  • Different natural sugars contain different minerals. My friend recommends using 3/4 natural cane sugar and 1/4 sucanat. I haven’t bought any sucanat yet, and the kefir is surviving fine on just the natural cane sugar, but I’m sure it would make them even happier to add sucanat.
  • You can get organic raisins in bulk from Country Life Natural Foods for only a few cents more per pound than Aldi’s raisins. Grapes are on the dirty dozen list, so as you can expect, conventionally grown raisins tend to have quite a bit of pesticide residue! 
Have you made kefir water? If so, what’s your favorite flavoring? 
[Full disclosure: links to some products in this post are my referral links.]