11 Books Worth Reading (Summer Reading Recap)

“Reading more” was one of my goals for this summer. When life gets busy, reading is usually one of the first things I drop. But there are just too many wonderful books out there to not devote a few minutes each day to reading.

Though I’ll likely never zoom through four books a week like some amazing folks do, I did make it through eleven books this summer that were worth the effort.

Books Worth Reading

  1. I’m No Angel: Winsome and humble. That’s the spirit of this beautiful autobiographic tale of a young Christian wife who made it to one of the most coveted runways ever as a Victoria Secret Angel model… and gave it all up to be a Proverbs 31 wife.
  2. The Five Love LanguagesI don’t like books that put people in boxes or encourage us to make excuses for sinful behavior. The Five Love Languages did neither. If we don’t speak the love language of our spouse (or child, sibling, friend, etc) it is easy to think that we’re obeying the command to “love one another”, but not demonstrating it in ways that are as meaningful as we think.
  3. Little Princes: This is the gripping autobiography of a young man who decided he was going to spend his life savings on a trip round the world. In order to ease his conscience (and stop his friends from shaking their heads in disapproval) he started his trek with a short stint at an orphanage in Nepal. Little did he know he would come to care about these children and battle greedy child-traffickers, overwhelmed officials, war-ravaged cities, and a dangerous trip along goat paths for their sakes.
  4. Lessons at Blackberry Inn: With the clear goal of inspiring readers to imitation, Karen Andreola paints a beautiful image of a homeschool family. It’s set in the country during the Great Depression. At times it was overly sentimental, but laid a compelling case for the art of gentle learning. (Plus, I love books that honor happy marriages!)
  5. Mara: Daughter of the Nile & The Golden Goblet*: This year, we’re studying Creation to the Fall of the Roman Empire. I thought these novels might be fun read-alouds to highlight life in ancient Egypt, but were too complex. I sure loved them though! Nothing like getting your history lesson in the form of a fast-paced novel!
  6. Toward a Truly Free Market: Joshua read this book with some guys from church, and highly recommended it. I was a bit leery about beginning a dense book on economics, but found it totally worth the effort. The author offers a fresh and compelling view of economic theory. If you’re worried about the direction our economy is headed, I highly recommend Toward a Truly Free Market.
  7. Fresh Eggs Daily: A fun and simple read, this beautifully illustrated book is a great guide to caring for chickens naturally. It’s filled with great facts like “planting mint near the coop helps repel mice” and what weeds and table scraps are good for chickens.
  8. The Art of War: One of those classics I had never got around to reading. Which is silly since it’s super short and so universally loved (and Librivox has a great free audio recording of it.)
  9. Fat Chance: Beathing the Odds against Suger, Processed Foods, Obsity, and Disease: Obesity is an ever growing problem in the modern world and we must stop saying it’s just a self-discipline issue, because it isn’t. This book is an excellent look at how our bodies deal with extra fat, the biochemical causes of obesity, why diets rarely work, and how to increase our (and our children’s) chances for healthy lifestyles.
  10. Surprising Secrets of Highly Happy Marriages: ‘m blessed with a very happy marriage, but there’s always room to make it even better, right? This book is filled with simple “secrets” that highly happy couple practice, and all marriages can incorporate.
  11. The Eagle of the Ninth*: Another historically-based novel that was a bit too mature for the kids, but was a fascinating tale about life in Roman Britain. It’s amazing how a story gives feeling and life to the dry facts of ancient times.

On the Bookshelf this Fall

What’s on your bookshelf? 

—————————————————–

[Full disclosure: Links to products in this post are my referral links.]

(Another reason I didn’t think these were appropriate for my children is that I want to wait to introduce false gods to them till they are mature enough to appreciate the wonderful truth that these false gods were conquered by Christ.)

 photo credit

Post Signature

Comments

  1. Vanessa says

    Thanks for this post! I appreciate your reviews. I am adding several of these to my “to read” list. I hope you enjoy Les Misarables, I really enjoyed it though it is quite long and, well, sad.

    • anna says

      Hope you enjoy the books as much as I did.

      I am enjoying Les Miserables, but it seems that every time I start to get really engrossed in the story, there’s an hour long detour to discuss political theory, philosophy, or religion. 🙂

  2. Kelsey Zink says

    Thanks for sharing these, Anna! “The Eagle of the Ninth” is one of my top favorites 🙂 But I am always on the lookout for a good book, so many of the others are now added to my reading list! (And I think you’ll love “Les Miserables” 🙂 )

    • anna says

      I hope you enjoy them as much as I did! 🙂

      And thanks for the encouragement. Les Miserables seems like one of those books that I ought to have read, but boy are there some long philosophical detours from the main story.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *